Larry Elliot

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Larry Elliot

Speaker, and Guardian Economics editor since 1998

Larry Elliott is the Guardian’s economics editor and has been with the paper since 1998.

He is a prominent speaker on the UK & global economies, trade and development and the interface between economics and the environment. He is widely recognised as one of Europe’s leading futurists on trends within the global economy.

Larry Elliot is a graduate of Fitzwilliam College, Cambridge. He was part of the group that put together the proposal for a “Green New Deal”, published by the New… 

Larry Elliott is the Guardian’s economics editor and has been with the paper since 1998.

He is a prominent speaker on the UK & global economies, trade and development and the interface between economics and the environment. He is widely recognised as one of Europe’s leading futurists on trends within the global economy.

Larry Elliot is a graduate of Fitzwilliam College, Cambridge. He was part of the group that put together the proposal for a “Green New Deal”, published by the New Economics Foundation in 2008. He is currently a visiting fellow at Hertfordshire University, on the board of the Scott Trust, a council member of the Overseas Development Institute and an adviser to the Catalyst think tank and Red Pepper magazine.

Larry is the co-author of three books with Dan Atkinson – “The Age of Insecurity” (1998); “Fantasy Island” (2007), which warned that Britain’s growth under New Labour was a debt-driven illusion; and “The Gods That Failed” (2008), an analysis of the events and forces that brought the global financial system to the brink of collapse. He has also co-authored “In or Out: Labour and the Euro” with Andrew Gamble and Janet Bush.

Testimonials: “The Gods That Failed”

‘The arrogance of the view that the boom and bust cycle had been abolished, and the inevitability of the bust are vividly brought out in The Gods That Failed’
Observer

‘Has withstood the test of time, despite being published before the events of this Autumn - largely because the authors took such a pessimistic, not to mention dim, view of global finance in the first place...a rollicking, acerbic account of the bubble and its collapse’
Daily Telegraph

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